Lawns for Wildlife

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There is an increasing trend towards households having artificial lawns installed. This is a growing business as more and more people are having their lawns replaced, opting for a low maintenance alternative to the traditional lawn. However, whilst artificial lawns may seem like a good short-term solution, there are growing concerns on how this will affect our garden wildlife, as well as the environmental sustainability of such an industry.

Around 87% houses have gardens, which cover approximately 2% of all land. That’s a large area which is becoming more and more important for our wildlife as land use changes continue to prioritise everything but nature. Our gardens are some of the last refuges for many of our animals, including declining yet important pollinator species and our soil-dwelling fauna such as earthworms. In a study earlier this year, 42% of our farmland fields were shown to be deficient or even absent of earthworms, highlighting just how important our gardens are for such creatures.

Cinnabar moth larvae

Species such as this cinnabar moth larvae rely on plants which can be found in grasslands.

In the age of the climate crisis and threat of a 6th mass extinction, with many of our native flora and fauna in decline, it is imperative that our actions are helping not hindering this process. But, does that have to mean getting out the lawn mower and slogging away at the end of a long day at work? Not at all. In fact, a traditional lawn isn’t the ideal option either. There are some fantastic alternatives if a lawn isn’t something you are able to or want to maintain (which is totally fine too, because we’re not all blessed with the time or ability to do so).

Law mowing is such a drag. definitely my least favourite job. Letting the grass grow is great for wildlife but also appeals to my lazy side too!

So, what can you do instead?

Grow a meadow

Embrace the long grass and wildflowers. This option is much less work too, only needing to be cut twice a year; early spring and late summer.Cease mowing and over time your lawn will welcome other plants such as buttercups and dandelions which are incredibly beneficial to nectar-loving pollinators. If you want to add more colour, consider adding some wildflower seeds. I’d recommend native flowers as they also offer other benefits other than just nectar to our wildlife such as being food plants for caterpillars but it’s your garden so if you’d prefer a different mix, go for it. (but never sow non-native ‘wildflower’ seed mixes in the countryside).

lawn

This small lawn was left to grow to see what appeared; lots of dandelions, forget-me-nots, chickweed and even some tulips all appeared.

Low-growing plants

Plants like clover, creeping thyme and chamomile are wonderful as they are low-growing and easy to maintain, making an ideal alternative to grass, whilst also benefiting pollinators.

Meadow (6)

Clovers, medicks and birds-foot-trefoil make great plants to add to your lawn.

Grow a Moss Lawn

Perfect if your lawn is already prone to moss or is on a more acidic soil. Moss requires semi-shaded damp conditions to thrive – and it feels great under the toes!

Lawn

This lawn was mostly moss due to the damp and semi-shaded conditions of the garden.

 

Go lawn-less

Remove your lawn all together and opt for a more varied planting scheme with meandering pathways, richly planted beds and a decked area for seating. Lawn-less gardens can be both wildlife-friendly and low-maintenance. Using raised beds is an ideal way to create a garden if you’re less able to get to the ground to weed or prune whilst still creating an enjoyable space, as well as giving the option to incorporate some herb or vegetable growing.

Veg Patch

Adding a veg patch increases the diversity of your garden whilst also giving you tasty produce too!

 

These are just a few alternatives to lawns which are also wildlife friendly. Have you replaced your lawn?

 

Ringlets

Butterflies like these ringlets require long native grasses to breed.

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