Hampton Court Flower Show 2015

I woke up on Thursday with that giddy ‘going on holiday’ feeling in my stomach. But I wasn’t heading off on a jet plane, instead I was driving down the road to Hampton Court Flower Show with my partner’s mother. We arrived without any traffic hassles which was a surprise and after negotiating the pushchair over the pedestrian footbridge and following the meandering crowd (mostly comprised of people of the ‘older’ generation) we arrived at the show. One thing that caught my eye on the way in were the magnificent sculpted trees which made me feel I had walked in to a Lewis Caroll novel.

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The show, celebrating it’s 25th year was relatively busy and bustling with people pulling cartloads of plants and drinking pimms. Managing the heat, the crowds and a somewhat restless and curious baby was a bit of a challenge. However we still made it around and brought a few treats home with us!

All the gardens were absolutely stunning, with the exception of Simon Webster’s garden ‘Ready…Aim…Flower!’ which to me just didn’t quite move past the sheer oddness of it. I noticed that many of the gardens had incorporated elements of wildflowers which I really liked to see. I love the wildflower look, it’s slightly scruffy, mixed with delicate floral displays and can be tailored to suit almost any situation, whilst still attracting an array of pollinators.

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I particularly liked the colour scheme exhibited in the Macmillan Legacy Garden which won a gold award. The muted oranges and peaches of the flowers to me looked liked the plants had a vintage Instagram filter over them and worked really well. This inspired me to buy some flowers this colour from the show for my own garden at home.

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Bu my favourite garden of all was the Community Street Garden With it’s mixture of attractive borders, creative vegetable planting, green roofs and homes for wildlife. It worked very well as an example of sustainable urban gardening.

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Here are a few more highlights of the show.

Where it all began

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It began in Barnes…leafy, lovely Barnes. We were renting the cottage above, and beside a small patch of grass with a narrow flowerbed border and a rear ‘courtyard garden’ (estate agent speak for small concreted square), what you can see is pretty much what we had to work with. I loved it. It was mine and I nurtured it every day, almost.

After 18 months the landlady wanted her house back and we were evicted mid tenancy. I had spent a fair amount of money during that time getting carried away at the garden centre filling the small garden with plants, bulbs and furniture in every little bare patch I could. It flowered throughout the seasons and provided homes for birds, insects and bees, even being visited by stag beetles!

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Leaving almost all of it behind was pretty devastating. There are wildflowers probably blooming right now which I never got to see in their full glory. I Brought some plants with me – but many I didn’t. I bet the hops (Humulus lupus) last year were fantastic.

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In June 2014 we moved. We moved to Croydon.

What we lost in boutique coffee shops, good pubs, farmer’s markets and expensive shops we could never afford to go in, we gained through much cheaper garden centres and this…

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When we moved in the grass was waist height – a meadow teaming with butterflies. The patio was also a meadow as the cracks burst with plants. With the grass too tall for a flymo, we ordered a petrol strimmer and got to work. Uncovering the garden was both exhausting and exciting. I was pregnant at the time so my boyfriend did a lot of the hard graft, but I didn’t get away too easily!

This blog will document the transformation of the garden as well as all things garden related. Why not read all about the pond in the post here.

The Pond – Part 1: Creating a home for the frogs

I’m going to kick this blog off with a post about my favourite part of the garden; the pond. It’s my favourite for many reasons but the main two are that it didn’t cost us anything to install and it attracts so much wildlife to the garden. I really think that having a pond, no matter how small makes such a difference if you are aiming to attract wildlife.

When we viewed the house last year we were sold when we saw the garden and was told that we were free to do as we like with it (within reason of course!). It was a blank canvas – an overgrown large patch of grass with the woodland behind our house encroaching into the back part of the garden. Perfect.

A blank canvas

We moved in and I was eager to get going. It was June, it was hot and I was pregnant so progress was slow. It took us a while to get around to mowing the lawn as we had to purchase a petrol brushcutter. The grass was so long the flymo couldn’t handle it. Standing by the edge of the garden I noticed that the ground below my feet was springy and squelched. It looked like the rest of the lawn, but something felt different. After a bit of investigating, we found a small pre-formed pond which had been filled with rocks and bricks with grass growing over the top. It had been abandoned and we decided to bring it back to life.

I emptied the pond of bricks, rocks and some of the mud, piling up the soil on the bank for the marginal plants. There was water in the pond still so I left a lot of the mud there thinking that perhaps some of the creatures had survived, especially as i found so many frogs and toads hiding out under the rocks. Also, by leaving in some mud it added an instant pond bed. I wondered whether it would be too rich in nutrients which could cause problems later on and ideally I should have carried out a nutrient test, but I took a chance and left it in (mainly because pulling all the bricks out had worn me out and I was eager to see it finished!).

Unfortunately I had to stop anyway because I managed to put a hole in the side of the pond with my spade. Tip – be careful when using tools to dig or clear a pond, especially if it is made using pond liner – seems obvious doesn’t it! I ordered some pond putty and left the pond alone for a few days.

With the hole fixed, it was time to add some structures for all the frogs and toads to get in and out and to hide in. I used the rocks to build up one side of the pond and added a couple of logs. Ideally a wildlife pond should have a shallow end or a gradual transition from the bank to the pond. This is achievable with a pond-liner but not as easy with a preformed pond. It’s also about working with what you have too when renting.

We were lucky to have a beautiful large fern growing next to the pond. My partner has a good eye for aesthetics and so to compliment the fern he suggested we piled up more rocks around the edge of the pond and under the fern. By this point, we already had a resident living in the pond. A large fat frog had moved in and every now and then popped his head above the water to check out his new digs.

Finally, the last stage was to add the plants. I planted lesser spearwort Ranunculus flammula, soft rush Juncus effusus, and purple loosestrife Lythrum salicaria in the pond itself in basket planters, and ivy-leaved duckweed Lemna trisulca and a water soldier Stratoites aloides in the middle.

Around the edge I planted a few garden plants I brought with us from our old house including purple toadflax Linaria purpurea and the following native marginal plants:

  • silverweed Argentina anserina
  • ragged robin Silene flos-cuculi
  • water figwort Scrophularia auriculata
  • teasel Dipsacus fillonum
  • marsh ragwort Senecio aquaticus
  • marsh woundwort Stachys palustris
  • rosebay willowherb Chamerion angustifolium – seeds
  • great willowherb Epilobium hirsutum – seeds
  • hemp agrimony Eupatorium cannabinum – seeds
  • Common fleabane Pulicaria dysenterica – seeds.

One the plants were in, it was just a case of letting nature take over. We were surprised just how quickly the wildlife found it. The foxes would come to drink from it each evening, dragonflies laid their eggs in it and bats came to feed on the midges emerging from it. By Autumn, the pond had established and we couldn’t wait to see what arrived in spring, but that’s a whole other blog post.

Autumnal pond